Matricentric Feminism is a Gift to the World

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Andrea O’Reilly has a new book out called Matricentric Feminism. What’s that you ask? Its a feminism that centres mothers and recognises that being a mother is its own social, political, economic and psychological position. Mothers are a social category and need a feminism that recognises this. Likewise, as feminists we need to re-centre motherhood given the ongoing structural inequality produced by motherhood.

O’Reilly explores the theory, practice, activism and academic position of matricentric feminism. She takes us on a journey through diverse maternal feminist theory,  the emergence and growth of the motherhood movement in the 21st century, the practice of feminist mothering (and mothering as a feminist) and the complex, unacknowledged place of motherhood within academic feminism. I had the honour of writing the forward for this book having known Andrea personally and professionally for almost two decades now. You can read my forward here.

 

From the blurb:

The book argues that the category of mother is distinct from the category of woman, and that many of the problems mothers face—social, economic, political, cultural, psychological, and so forth—are specific to women’s role and identity as mothers. Indeed, mothers are oppressed under patriarchy as women and as mothers. Consequently, mothers need a feminism of their own, one that positions mothers’ concerns as the starting point for a theory and politic of empowerment. O’Reilly terms this new mode of feminism matricentic feminism and the book explores how it is represented and experienced in theory, activism, and practice. The chapter on maternal theory examines the central theoretical concepts of maternal scholarship while the chapter on activism considers the twenty-first century motherhood movement. Feminist mothering is likewise examined as the specific practice of matricentric feminism and this chapter discusses various theories and strategies on and for maternal empowerment. Matricentric feminism is also examined in relation to the larger field of academic feminism; here O’Reilly persuasively shows how matricentric feminism has been marginalized in academic feminism and considers the reasons for such exclusion and how such may be challenged and changed.

Petra Bueskens | Mother, scholar, psychotherapist | Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Melbourne Daylesford